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  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on June 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    4 principles to achieve motivated teams 

    Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

    4 principles to achieve motivated teams When you start working in a coaching process, you use different tools that help boost the team’s alignment with the new work philosophy and the culture that the employer or manager wants for their company. Specifying a vision, mission, cultural values or points, job descriptions and their respective KPI’s, procedure manuals and other tools are really helpful in meeting this challenge.

    However, the current team commonly finds the process exhausting. Taking the team out of its comfort zone is too much for some members who, given the changes, decide to jump ship. In the case of employees who decide to stay, it is important that employers or managers recognise that members are going the extra mile and seek out additional reinforcements to keep their team motivated and achieve greater commitment to the company.

    When thinking about incentives for our employees, the first thing that comes to mind is… money! Although money is attractive for some people, there are 4 principles which we should focus on to achieve greater engagement, generate more trust and increase motivation in the current team:

    Power

    Power means that your employees have the authority to take decisions that are important to their performance and to the quality of their working lives. In companies people are usually given responsibility without authority. This limits the individual’s decision making and ultimately generates frustration. Empowering your employees means that they can decide and then receive feedback. Let them take responsibility and have complete authority over their decisions and their outcomes.

    Information

    This means data, statistics, KPIs, revenues, profitability, customer reactions, etc. Just as many Mexicans are demanding access to information from our government, your team must also have access to your business information. This information must be accurate, current and understandable for employees.

    The more transparent the leader of the company is about its information, the greater the possibility that employees will effectively contribute to achieving strategic business goals. Thus the employee will be able to link the company’s progress towards its various goals to his or her personal contribution to each of these goals.

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  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on January 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    Do You Set Goals for Your Business? Or Just Wishful Thinking? 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    We are in the era where we define and execute new goals in the new year. The question is: How many goals did you accomplish last year? The reality is that we are used to filling ourselves with “wishful thinking”, in our life and in our business, thus not fulfilling actual goals. And the sad thing is that new year resolutions become a list of actions or changes that take place the first week of January, and later, they end up throwing in the towel and going back to the same old habits.      

    If we want to accomplish these resolutions and not convert them into a list thrown into the trash as quickly as children throw wrapping paper from their presents away on the 25th of December; if we want to talk about true goals, key points to consider are:

    1. To be sufficiently specific, i.e., detail it as much as possible so that there is clarity (without the need to provide previous explanations) and both you as a business professional, as your work team, perfectly understand the goal to achieve. An Enterprise Social Network allows you to transfer the message in a clear and concise way.

    2. It must be measurable, i.e., have a quantifiable parameter that allows you to know how you are advancing with respect to the goal and time.

    3. It should be reachable. Beforehand, know that it is a challenge, but with this additional effort, you will be able to achieve the goal. If you obtain it without effort, then it is not a goal. It is only a task.

    4. Target a result. Let it be clear- why do I want to achieve this goal? What do I get when the goal is reached?

    5. Define a specific date to reach this goal, or a clear time mark. The act of it being reachable generally goes tied to this criterion. Then be realistic, yet bold in setting the date for this goal.

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  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on November 4, 2013 Permalink | Reply
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    Enterprise Social Networking and Coaching: how to make a positive impact on the company integrating both tools 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    When a business owner or director is coached, he/she lives with the challenge of everything that they have learned permeating with their partners in the organization. People perceive their leader, after finishing a coaching session, will leave the session with renewed energy, with different ideas of the status quo and with motivation to implement immediate changes in the company or department. However, there is no clarity in why business owners or directors are making these decisions and how partners can contribute to the changes given to them.

    An excellent support tool for people to become clear of all the reasons changes are made, are enterprise social networks. Remember that a coaching process focuses on the company becoming more profitable, more efficient and to allow partners to align with the vision of the leaders of the company.

    How does an enterprise social network contribute to the achievement of these objectives?

    First, since it is currently being integrated into the workplace, they are an attractive tool for the generations born in the late eighties. They are also an opportunity for older people to share their knowledge and experience with these new incoming youth.

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  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on October 18, 2013 Permalink | Reply
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    4 Principles to Achieve a Highly Motivated Team 

    Estimated Reading Time: 8 minutes

    When thinking about incentives for our employees, the first thing that comes to mind is money! Although for some people money is very attractive. But money is not necessarily the most important motivator. There are four principles on which we should focus to achieve greater engagement, generate more trust and increase the motivation of the current team: Power, Information, knowledge and Rewards.

    1. Power: Power means employees have the authority to make important decisions for their performance and professionally  improve their quality of life. This implies that they decide and then get feedback. Or they accept responsibility or total authority of their decisions and its results.  It has a lot to do with the 5th key for a Winning Team to“encourage risk taking” in order to offer our employees the opportunity to make decisions on their own account. In this way, reward them if they give good results or feedback. Additionally, they can learn from their mistake if they did not obtain the planned result.

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