Tagged: Enterprise 2.0 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on June 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Enterprise 2.0, , , , , , ,   

    4 principles to achieve motivated teams 

    Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

    4 principles to achieve motivated teams When you start working in a coaching process, you use different tools that help boost the team’s alignment with the new work philosophy and the culture that the employer or manager wants for their company. Specifying a vision, mission, cultural values or points, job descriptions and their respective KPI’s, procedure manuals and other tools are really helpful in meeting this challenge.

    However, the current team commonly finds the process exhausting. Taking the team out of its comfort zone is too much for some members who, given the changes, decide to jump ship. In the case of employees who decide to stay, it is important that employers or managers recognise that members are going the extra mile and seek out additional reinforcements to keep their team motivated and achieve greater commitment to the company.

    When thinking about incentives for our employees, the first thing that comes to mind is… money! Although money is attractive for some people, there are 4 principles which we should focus on to achieve greater engagement, generate more trust and increase motivation in the current team:

    Power

    Power means that your employees have the authority to take decisions that are important to their performance and to the quality of their working lives. In companies people are usually given responsibility without authority. This limits the individual’s decision making and ultimately generates frustration. Empowering your employees means that they can decide and then receive feedback. Let them take responsibility and have complete authority over their decisions and their outcomes.

    Information

    This means data, statistics, KPIs, revenues, profitability, customer reactions, etc. Just as many Mexicans are demanding access to information from our government, your team must also have access to your business information. This information must be accurate, current and understandable for employees.

    The more transparent the leader of the company is about its information, the greater the possibility that employees will effectively contribute to achieving strategic business goals. Thus the employee will be able to link the company’s progress towards its various goals to his or her personal contribution to each of these goals.

    (More …)

     
  • Oscar Berg 11:34 am on January 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Enterprise 2.0, ,   

    The State and Future of Enterprise Collaboration 

    Editor’s note: Oscar Berg (@oscarberg) has let us republish this article from his blog where he talks about how can we use new tools to change the way we work?

    The “flying machine” consisting of 45 helium-filled weather balloons that was used by Lawrence Richard Walters, an American truck driver, when he took flight on July 2 1982, reaching an altitude of over 15,000 feet.

    More than a year ago, in an article for CMS Wire, I wrote that corporations are starting to ask themselves the following questions:

     ”Now that we all have the tools, what shall we do with them? How can we use them to change the way we work? And even if we see the use cases and want to change our ways of working, how do our work environments encourage and enable us to do this?“

    I think this pretty much sums up where a lot of corporations are today; they have implemented new communication and collaboration tools, but they still have a lot of work to do ahead to figure out how to use them to develop better ways of working, as well as how to create good conditions for information workers that supports the change process.

    Without a doubt, the importance and availability of social, mobile and cloud technologies will continue to increase. What will change is the focus; corporations will be shifting their focus from implementing tools to how they can make productive use of the tools and make change happen inside their organizations.

    As we are soon moving into 2014, it can be a good idea to take a look at some recent research related to Enterprise Collaboration. Below, I have put together links to some of the research studies I have come across recently, highlighting some findings from each piece of research that I found interesting. I hope you will as well. (More …)

     
  • Sergio Ríos 9:00 am on January 23, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Enterprise 2.0,   

    What do you need in order to begin to be an Enterprise 2.0? 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    The concept of an Enterprise has not really changed in its essence, but at last it seems that the Management and People concepts are integrating more and more in organizations. These concepts embrace: strategy, processes, indicators, benchmarking, quality, teams, marketing, positioning, culture, leadership, results, excellence, people, collaboration, sustainability, etc.

    The fast changing and ever more competition coupled with the ease of access to new technologies that were once expensive and complex to implement this change has led to the Business/Enterprise 2.0.

    What is an Enterprise 2.0?

    An Enterprise 2.0 is one that integrates collaborative technological platforms to make its business objectives a reality, but that exploits a sense, from the people’s perspective and with a clear business sustainability focus. 

    Don’t forget that it’s not just about tools, since they, themselves, don’t do much more than be used. The objective(s) of this use will determine if they are the leverage of change or not, within an organization.

    Normally, whenever a project is launched, the second action to launch after the initial analysis tends to be the technological support tool. Having reached the end of implementation, the client believes that the greater part of the project has ended and is unaware that the change management is the essential and critical part in the entire process. 

    This change management is the key to success in an Enterprise 2.0, and therefore, a key to the sustainability of existing businesses. 

    The future sustainability of businesses go through an Optimization of resources and excellent management of them. By resources, understand not only the traditional ones, but also the talent, culture, accessability, knowledge, relations, etc. 

    (More …)

     
  • Zyncro Blog 9:00 am on January 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Enterprise 2.0, , ,   

    Three of the Worst Bad Practices in Social Networks 

    Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes

    Editor’s note: This article that we’re sharing today is an english adaptation of this post by Edna Campos published in our Spanish blog made by Zyncro.

    Any business or organization with a website can benefit from having an excellent presence in social networks. However, having a strong presence in social channels implies much more than simply creating profiles on the most popular networks.

    Unfortunately, many businesses fall into using the worst practices when trying to jump into social networks without being prepared. Here, I will discuss a few of them with you:

    1. Not having the basics for doing online marketing

    You will be in agreement with me when I say that it is an error to try to correctly carry out a content marketing campaign without having a website and blog, in which content that will be provided in the social networks can be created in the social networks. These should have responsive designs, with the purpose of making sure they can reach the growing number of mobile users.

    2. Unable to handle thier online properties

    Something I see constantly when we receive new clients is they are not aware of the advances in technology and tools that they can use with good practices, and instead they leave them in the hands of others,  their valuable internet properties.

    The same must be said of their accounts in social networks. They were created by a worker (who no longer works at the company) utilizing a personal email address, with different names. And now the company has all of its social networks under names that do not form a part of its digital identity. (More …)

     
  • Gustavo Martínez 9:00 am on January 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Enterprise 2.0, , , ,   

    Keys to Success in Video Blogging for Your Company 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    In previous occasions, in this same space, I spoke about the advantages and usefulness of having an internal video blog for your company and specifically for your product. Including a video blog on your website, additionally getting you closer to your target audience, will generate more traffic that will later generate more sales for your business.

    A video blog is one of the most direct forms of communication on the internet. It allows your public to feel closer to you and makes the experience more dynamic for the visitor on your website, so it is recommended that you take into account five important points if you want to succeed with this tool.

    1. Avoid monotony

    Video blogs, even though their production involves processes similar to television production, are very different in the background and form.  Managing a friendly, clear and understandable language will capture the attention of your audience. Do not improvise. Give yourself the time to prepare the content of your capsule. Research done beforehand about the subject and a script can help you out a lot. (More …)

     
  • Raúl González García 10:36 am on January 16, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , company social network, , Enterprise 2.0, , ,   

    Change Management for Implementing an Enterprise Social Network in Your Organization 

    Estimated Reading Time: 8 minutes

    Photo Change Management for Implementing an Enterprise Social Network in Your Organization

    Implementing a collaboration and communication tool as useful as an Enterprise Social Network entails a certain change of mentality and organizational culture. And all change must be managed in order to display all of its transformation potential. 

    Managing change consists of utilizing a method of maps, indicating the path to the desired goal. One of the most simple and easy methods based in the principles of Change Leadership developed by John Kotter, consultant and professor at the Harvard Business School.

    This author investigated change processes in a multitude of organizations of all sizes, and he identified the phases, challenges, the most common errors and main factors of success in organizational change processes. 

    Kotter presented a very practical model of change, that consists of eight steps every organization should cover in order to manage any change in an effective manner. 

    1. Create a sense of urgency.

    This consists of making the people involved to see that change is necessary, important and positive. What will happen with our organization in the near future, if we do not implement an Enterprise Social Network now, in an era in which there is a progressive and rapid digitization of all sectors? Don’t just give a mere rational explication, because people don’t change with rational arguments. Rather, make them see and feel the need of change. In order to be effective, the message should include a 20% sense of negativity (the consequences of not changing, such as losing competitiveness as an organization, or becoming obsolete as professionals). And an 80% sense of positivity (important consequences and the positives of change, including more effective communication, or development posed to the people involved to acquire digital skills, etc.). (More …)

     
  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on January 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Enterprise 2.0, ,   

    Do You Set Goals for Your Business? Or Just Wishful Thinking? 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    We are in the era where we define and execute new goals in the new year. The question is: How many goals did you accomplish last year? The reality is that we are used to filling ourselves with “wishful thinking”, in our life and in our business, thus not fulfilling actual goals. And the sad thing is that new year resolutions become a list of actions or changes that take place the first week of January, and later, they end up throwing in the towel and going back to the same old habits.      

    If we want to accomplish these resolutions and not convert them into a list thrown into the trash as quickly as children throw wrapping paper from their presents away on the 25th of December; if we want to talk about true goals, key points to consider are:

    1. To be sufficiently specific, i.e., detail it as much as possible so that there is clarity (without the need to provide previous explanations) and both you as a business professional, as your work team, perfectly understand the goal to achieve. An Enterprise Social Network allows you to transfer the message in a clear and concise way.

    2. It must be measurable, i.e., have a quantifiable parameter that allows you to know how you are advancing with respect to the goal and time.

    3. It should be reachable. Beforehand, know that it is a challenge, but with this additional effort, you will be able to achieve the goal. If you obtain it without effort, then it is not a goal. It is only a task.

    4. Target a result. Let it be clear- why do I want to achieve this goal? What do I get when the goal is reached?

    5. Define a specific date to reach this goal, or a clear time mark. The act of it being reachable generally goes tied to this criterion. Then be realistic, yet bold in setting the date for this goal.

    (More …)

     
  • Denisse Caballero 9:00 am on January 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Enterprise 2.0, , , , , ,   

    Team Management vs. Leadership 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    liderazgo vs team managementFirst things first: What does it really mean to direct a work team and how does it differentiate with leadership? John P Kotter explains that leaders are people who do the right things, while the directors/managers are people who do things correctly. This does not mean that one is better than the other; in fact, these two roles are complementary to each other and to operate a team at work to be successful, you need to meet both requirements.

    We understand that  the basis of leadership is founded on the vision of the future, how to communicate that vision and helping people to understand and achieve. On the other hand, directors are those responsible for making this vision to be implemented effectively and successfully, in other words “create plans” to achieve that. That said we clarify that a leader is not necessarily a manager and not the opposite, but it is possible that they can be.

    On one hand, a real manager will provide order, therefore organize and promote compliance with the company’s plans, this will do it by making decisions and delegating functions using a formal structure to generate stability and avoid poor performance. A leader will establish a communication process and will push his/her team together utilizing informal relationships to establish bonds, of which will motivate the workers to transmit said energy to the rest of the team.

    (More …)

     
  • Rafael Garcia-Parrado 9:00 am on January 3, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Enterprise 2.0, , ,   

    Moving Toward Organizational Transparency 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    More and more people are embarking on designing and structuring an open organization, as marked by today’s standards in the strategic direction of the company. The market is more demanding and the uncertainty that surrounds it has teetered its stability, so that organizations are forced to be much more flexible in its operation to meet the challenges they face.

    A great quantity of companies continue with an obsolete organizational model based on rigid systems centered in the improvement of processes in terms of immediate and short term profitability, making it impossible to leave the road set by the hierarchical superior.

    The competition entails searching for new ideas that allow innovation in organizations, thus these business structures must be permeable to external influences, allowing them to grasp knowledge.

    This search for knowledge must not be subordinate to a simple technological surveillance system. Rather the workers themselves must be connected to allow the free circulation of ideas, with the possibility of sharing and generating knowledge validated within the organization. Thus the benefits of internalization would apply to any project or task.

    The organizational challenge is to get internal talent connected and to align them with the company’s strategy. But no one said this would be easy, thus the company’s culture must be aligned with the business model, being the key human resources function to ensure that employer and employee move in the same direction. 

    (More …)

     
  • Ana Asuero 9:00 am on December 18, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Enterprise 2.0, , ,   

    3 Things Your Business Needs In Order To Be Social 

    Note from the editor: A few days ago, Innovación Chile (Innovation Chile) published this article we wrote together about innovations that businesses need in order to be social. Today we share it with you :)

    The Enterprise 2.0 has been a reality for several years now. The concept of Social Business has long ago been left behind as just fashionalbe, and now converted itself into a business reality. But, do you really know what it means to be an enterprise 2.0 and practice social business?

    Some still think that this concept is about having accounts on social channels like Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook. But it is not. Being a social business or enterprise is much more than being present in social tools. Being a social business involves creating and launching a transformation process of the way work is done and business is completed in organizations, applying new forms of communication from social networks to the business world and taking advantage of opportunities to transform businesses in organizations improving communication, connectivity, collaboration and productivity.

    Being a social business is not only a question of tools. It implies a cultural change and process that changes the organization in all of its layers. An Enterprise 2.0 is a new form of communicating, a new form of managing, a new form of interacting, a new form of necessary cooperation within companies.  An evolution, after all, of the traditional business standards. In fact, there are concrete features that characterize these organizations and the professionals who work in them.

    It is necessary to evolve towards this business model but, how do you get there?

    In my opinion, there are 3 necessary changes any organization needs in order to take a leap and convert itself into a social enterprise.

    1. Your business needs a cultural change and you will only achieve it if the leadership of your organization is the first to be convinced of the need to carry out this change and support it.

    We already mentioned it above. Change is not a matter of tools. On the contrary, the need for people who are convinced of the benefits of moving from closed organizational structures to more horizontal structures where collaboration, dialogue and shared knowledge are some of the fundamental pieces. If we want businesses to be social, CEOs must be the first social members.

    (More …)

     
    • Sanjay Abraham 4:12 pm on December 18, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      I couldn’t agree more Ana. Enterprises have to make a cultural shift to get the full benefits of Social transformation. This could happen when there is proper executive sponsorship and all rungs of the organisation participate in Social. Better engagement, collaboration and sharing in the employee, partner and customer communities could mean great value for enterprises.

    • Frank Latendresse 5:08 pm on January 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I’m not there yet with the idea that social has to start at the top. I actually think it radiates to the top. Like many behavioral or cultural changes, we start with a few people making some type of behavior (process) change; these behaviors eventually reach network hubs who spread the behavior exponentially. The leadership, CEO specifically, does not need to be the catalyst of the change. I agree that once leadership sees it, they should recognize the benefits, join, guide, and support it.

      So, here is a spin on 2. I believe the technologies needed to be social are already available. My position is that social tools already are talent-centric, but what is needed is a focus on the process that runs the business. I believe companies need to focus social efforts around letting people understand how they impact the business, how they impact other people and processes up and downstream, and ultimately how they impact the customer. As more people identify and describe their roles and connect them to the other people and processes across the organization, that is how we improve transparency.

      • Ana Asuero 9:54 am on January 9, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Hi Frank! Thanks for sharing your ideas. As you said, it’s not that the CEO has to be the first one adopting social behaviors, but it’s essential that they recognize their benefits to boost it use among employees. If their bosses don’t use an Enterprise Social Network to communicate, why are employees going to do so?

c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
shift + esc
cancel