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  • Ana Asuero 9:00 am on May 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , human resources 2.0, ,   

    How to solve Internal Communication problems with Enterprise Social Networks 

    Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

    How to solve Internal Communication problems with Enterprise Social NetworksDid you know that 60% of organisations’ problems are brought about by poor internal communication? These lead to conflict and situations which are detrimental to efficiency, productivity and the work environment. Zyncro seeks to solve these problems in companies by using social technology and implementing a new form of communication and collaboration between teams: Enterprise Social Networks.

    The importance of communication as a strategic value

    Internal communication is one of the main tools companies use to convey their values, vision and goals to their employees. It largely determines whether staff are aligned with corporate strategy and whether teams are effective and productive enough to successfully achieve the desired profit.

    According to this interpretation, communication is a tool that supports the business plan, providing consistency and integration between goals, plans and actions. Companies which afford it this strategic importance communicate internally to motivate their employees and keep them up to speed about their successes and failures, ensure that goals and objectives are well understood by all and gather contributions to enhance corporate processes and results.

    The challenge for organisations is to grasp that investment in this intangible asset – one which enables them to convey values and capital – is not only necessary to achieve their objectives but will also transform into business, process and sales benefits. How to solve a company’s internal communication problems in 3 steps

    The problems resulting from poor Internal Communication

    Many organisations still neglect their communication methods and refuse to invest in something that they continue to view as a cost. What are the consequences?

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  • Enrique Dans 9:00 am on March 12, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , human resources 2.0, , ,   

    Models for managing talent and innovation in organizations 

    Estimated reading time: 12 minutes

    Editor’s note: Enrique Dans (@edans) has let us republish this article from his blog where he talks about how do companies manage talent and innovation?

    Here’s an interesting question: how do companies manage talent and innovation, and what models can we use to map them? Working on the basis that any organization needs to attract new people of varying ages and experience on a regular basis, we can identify a range of variables that affect their ability to do this.

    On this basis we can see a number of models, which I tend to categorize thus:

    Sparta

    Companies that tend to attract younger talent, and then create mechanisms whereby said talent is only happy when performing at the highest level. Demanding organizations, they tend to be constantly measuring and evaluating their team, and normally end up creating something of a performance cult, which means that those who stay do so because their merits are beyond discussion. We’re talking here about a culture that recognizes and rewards effort: if you’re not up to the job, you will soon feel excluded and uncomfortable, and be obliged to leave. These companies are sometimes known as up or out operations.

    The Dead Sea

    The very opposite of the previous model, and much more widespread than is generally recognized. They tend to attract talent in different phases of development, but after a period of adaptation, employees realize that there are too many obstacles for them to express themselves, leaving them the option of adapting to a poorly functioning system, or having to leave in search of a company where they can better develop their talent. Generally, those who stay are less motivated and ambitious, which, coupled with poor training policies, ends up converting them into people with little motivation to find a another position of similar responsibility in another organization; they end up becoming a kind of sediment that often ends up putting off new talent from joining. Such organizations are usually highly bureaucratic, working along civil service lines, and where the goal is tenure.

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  • Rafael Garcia-Parrado 9:00 am on January 3, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , human resources 2.0,   

    Moving Toward Organizational Transparency 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    More and more people are embarking on designing and structuring an open organization, as marked by today’s standards in the strategic direction of the company. The market is more demanding and the uncertainty that surrounds it has teetered its stability, so that organizations are forced to be much more flexible in its operation to meet the challenges they face.

    A great quantity of companies continue with an obsolete organizational model based on rigid systems centered in the improvement of processes in terms of immediate and short term profitability, making it impossible to leave the road set by the hierarchical superior.

    The competition entails searching for new ideas that allow innovation in organizations, thus these business structures must be permeable to external influences, allowing them to grasp knowledge.

    This search for knowledge must not be subordinate to a simple technological surveillance system. Rather the workers themselves must be connected to allow the free circulation of ideas, with the possibility of sharing and generating knowledge validated within the organization. Thus the benefits of internalization would apply to any project or task.

    The organizational challenge is to get internal talent connected and to align them with the company’s strategy. But no one said this would be easy, thus the company’s culture must be aligned with the business model, being the key human resources function to ensure that employer and employee move in the same direction. 

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  • Ignasi Alcalde 9:00 am on December 30, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , human resources 2.0,   

    E-Skills: Competencies and Learning in the 21st Century 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    Note from the Editor: A few days ago we talked about the necessary qualities for a transformative leader in the 21st century in this article by Virginio Gallardo. Today, we would like to study in depth the subject of necessary skills every professional of our time needs to have with this article published by Ignasi Alcalde in his blog, of which he has given us today in order to open the debate here.

    The society of networks that we are immersed in determines a new global space in which businesses that want to be competitive in this new context and explore the potential of the digital revolution in a global society, interconnected and interdependent, must strategically use ICT (information and communication technologies) and train their staff, from the base of employees to top executives, in digital skills.

    In line with this reflection, I read recently in the e-Skills Manifesto by Don Tapscott, author of the famous book Wikinomics, that writes about manifesto as the importance that e-skills has and the digital competencies to propel competition, productivity and innovation, thus facilitating professionalism and the ability to employ.  E-skills or digital competencies are keys not only for coping in a global digital environment, but also they facilitate the acquisition of knowledge, skills and competencies the directors and employees of the business must have in order to modernize a permanent and effective learning process.

    Training in these new e-skills facilitate a rise in a new area within knowledge management, called PKM (Personal Knowledge Management). Depending on Wikipedia, the personal knowledge management is a collection of processes that one person uses to gather, classify, store, find, recuperate and share knowledge in his/her daily activities and the way in which these activities are done, facilitate work processes.

    This view promotes the notion that workers in the information society and knowledge each time have to be responsible of their own growth and learning and responsible for knowledge management with a focus from bottom to top. In other words, don’t wait for the hierarchy to dictate training. (More …)

     
  • Jose Miguel Bolívar 9:00 am on December 5, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , human resources 2.0   

    10 Indispensable Professional Qualities in the 21st Century 

    Note from the Editor:  Today we share with you this adaptation of the article José Miguel Bolívar published in his blog where he reflects about some indispensable qualities for professionals in the 21st century.

    What qualities define a well equipped person  to successfully meet challenges in the 21st century? There are probably many more, but to me, these 10 points come to mind:

    1. Adaptability: The key to survival is not intelligence nor might. Rather, the capability to adapt. Case in point, having developed the habit of keeping your mind’s cartography, in order to adapt to the world and the circumstances around you, you first need to know where you are.  Many people who do not change do not do it because they are not even conscious that their world has changed.

    2. Tolerance for risk and uncertainty: If there is something we know about the future it is that it will be distinct from what we know and probably distinct in the way we imagine it. The capacity to take on risks in a customary way, know how to cope with failure in a positive way and change the way in which we make decisions, are all essential elements.

    3. Orientation to projects: The ability to work towards concrete results, enclosed in time, combining various activities for one or multiple clients will become increasingly common.

    4. Mobility: The capacity to work in any place widens your possibilities when the time comes to integrate on diverse networks and work on multiple projects. This is one of the main characteristics that defines a knowmad.

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