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  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on June 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , human resources, , , , , ,   

    4 principles to achieve motivated teams 

    Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

    4 principles to achieve motivated teams When you start working in a coaching process, you use different tools that help boost the team’s alignment with the new work philosophy and the culture that the employer or manager wants for their company. Specifying a vision, mission, cultural values or points, job descriptions and their respective KPI’s, procedure manuals and other tools are really helpful in meeting this challenge.

    However, the current team commonly finds the process exhausting. Taking the team out of its comfort zone is too much for some members who, given the changes, decide to jump ship. In the case of employees who decide to stay, it is important that employers or managers recognise that members are going the extra mile and seek out additional reinforcements to keep their team motivated and achieve greater commitment to the company.

    When thinking about incentives for our employees, the first thing that comes to mind is… money! Although money is attractive for some people, there are 4 principles which we should focus on to achieve greater engagement, generate more trust and increase motivation in the current team:

    Power

    Power means that your employees have the authority to take decisions that are important to their performance and to the quality of their working lives. In companies people are usually given responsibility without authority. This limits the individual’s decision making and ultimately generates frustration. Empowering your employees means that they can decide and then receive feedback. Let them take responsibility and have complete authority over their decisions and their outcomes.

    Information

    This means data, statistics, KPIs, revenues, profitability, customer reactions, etc. Just as many Mexicans are demanding access to information from our government, your team must also have access to your business information. This information must be accurate, current and understandable for employees.

    The more transparent the leader of the company is about its information, the greater the possibility that employees will effectively contribute to achieving strategic business goals. Thus the employee will be able to link the company’s progress towards its various goals to his or her personal contribution to each of these goals.

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  • María Teresa Farfán 9:00 am on June 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , human resources, ,   

    7 types of workers in the company 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    7 types of workers in the companyKnowing how our colleagues work enables us, as a company, to shepherd them towards attaining their objectives and to make full use of their contributions.

    It is important to ascertain which team members may have specific aptitudes for certain jobs, such as concentration, the ability to work for hours on end, to interact with others, etc. This allows each leader to know his or her team and to distribute the work as efficiently as possible.

    As a leader, have you ever asked yourself what your team’s skills are? In a recent e-book, PGI classified the most common types of remote employees: How do they behave? How do they perceive their work?

    This e-book recognises 7 different types of remote employees, which I list below. How can each one capitalise on the advantages of an Enterprise Social Network? 

    1. The 24/7 Worker:

    We all know someone who answers emails at whatever time of day. This worker is a highly-dedicated stress junkie, so he exploits the advantages of an internal social network more effectively, since it will allow him to communicate with his colleagues at any time.

    2. The Multitasker:

    He’s the one who always has more than one tab open on his browser, at the same time as he’s sharing information via his smartphone and checking tasks pending on his tablet. This type of worker has to be constantly on the go, so the benefits of a multi-platform enterprise social network will help him to attain his work goals and to focus on his setting.

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  • Ana Asuero 9:00 am on May 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , human resources, , ,   

    How to solve Internal Communication problems with Enterprise Social Networks 

    Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

    How to solve Internal Communication problems with Enterprise Social NetworksDid you know that 60% of organisations’ problems are brought about by poor internal communication? These lead to conflict and situations which are detrimental to efficiency, productivity and the work environment. Zyncro seeks to solve these problems in companies by using social technology and implementing a new form of communication and collaboration between teams: Enterprise Social Networks.

    The importance of communication as a strategic value

    Internal communication is one of the main tools companies use to convey their values, vision and goals to their employees. It largely determines whether staff are aligned with corporate strategy and whether teams are effective and productive enough to successfully achieve the desired profit.

    According to this interpretation, communication is a tool that supports the business plan, providing consistency and integration between goals, plans and actions. Companies which afford it this strategic importance communicate internally to motivate their employees and keep them up to speed about their successes and failures, ensure that goals and objectives are well understood by all and gather contributions to enhance corporate processes and results.

    The challenge for organisations is to grasp that investment in this intangible asset – one which enables them to convey values and capital – is not only necessary to achieve their objectives but will also transform into business, process and sales benefits. How to solve a company’s internal communication problems in 3 steps

    The problems resulting from poor Internal Communication

    Many organisations still neglect their communication methods and refuse to invest in something that they continue to view as a cost. What are the consequences?

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  • Enrique Dans 9:00 am on March 12, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: human resources, , , ,   

    Models for managing talent and innovation in organizations 

    Estimated reading time: 12 minutes

    Editor’s note: Enrique Dans (@edans) has let us republish this article from his blog where he talks about how do companies manage talent and innovation?

    Here’s an interesting question: how do companies manage talent and innovation, and what models can we use to map them? Working on the basis that any organization needs to attract new people of varying ages and experience on a regular basis, we can identify a range of variables that affect their ability to do this.

    On this basis we can see a number of models, which I tend to categorize thus:

    Sparta

    Companies that tend to attract younger talent, and then create mechanisms whereby said talent is only happy when performing at the highest level. Demanding organizations, they tend to be constantly measuring and evaluating their team, and normally end up creating something of a performance cult, which means that those who stay do so because their merits are beyond discussion. We’re talking here about a culture that recognizes and rewards effort: if you’re not up to the job, you will soon feel excluded and uncomfortable, and be obliged to leave. These companies are sometimes known as up or out operations.

    The Dead Sea

    The very opposite of the previous model, and much more widespread than is generally recognized. They tend to attract talent in different phases of development, but after a period of adaptation, employees realize that there are too many obstacles for them to express themselves, leaving them the option of adapting to a poorly functioning system, or having to leave in search of a company where they can better develop their talent. Generally, those who stay are less motivated and ambitious, which, coupled with poor training policies, ends up converting them into people with little motivation to find a another position of similar responsibility in another organization; they end up becoming a kind of sediment that often ends up putting off new talent from joining. Such organizations are usually highly bureaucratic, working along civil service lines, and where the goal is tenure.

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  • Rafael Garcia-Parrado 9:00 am on January 3, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , human resources, ,   

    Moving Toward Organizational Transparency 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    More and more people are embarking on designing and structuring an open organization, as marked by today’s standards in the strategic direction of the company. The market is more demanding and the uncertainty that surrounds it has teetered its stability, so that organizations are forced to be much more flexible in its operation to meet the challenges they face.

    A great quantity of companies continue with an obsolete organizational model based on rigid systems centered in the improvement of processes in terms of immediate and short term profitability, making it impossible to leave the road set by the hierarchical superior.

    The competition entails searching for new ideas that allow innovation in organizations, thus these business structures must be permeable to external influences, allowing them to grasp knowledge.

    This search for knowledge must not be subordinate to a simple technological surveillance system. Rather the workers themselves must be connected to allow the free circulation of ideas, with the possibility of sharing and generating knowledge validated within the organization. Thus the benefits of internalization would apply to any project or task.

    The organizational challenge is to get internal talent connected and to align them with the company’s strategy. But no one said this would be easy, thus the company’s culture must be aligned with the business model, being the key human resources function to ensure that employer and employee move in the same direction. 

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  • Ignasi Alcalde 9:00 am on December 30, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , human resources, ,   

    E-Skills: Competencies and Learning in the 21st Century 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    Note from the Editor: A few days ago we talked about the necessary qualities for a transformative leader in the 21st century in this article by Virginio Gallardo. Today, we would like to study in depth the subject of necessary skills every professional of our time needs to have with this article published by Ignasi Alcalde in his blog, of which he has given us today in order to open the debate here.

    The society of networks that we are immersed in determines a new global space in which businesses that want to be competitive in this new context and explore the potential of the digital revolution in a global society, interconnected and interdependent, must strategically use ICT (information and communication technologies) and train their staff, from the base of employees to top executives, in digital skills.

    In line with this reflection, I read recently in the e-Skills Manifesto by Don Tapscott, author of the famous book Wikinomics, that writes about manifesto as the importance that e-skills has and the digital competencies to propel competition, productivity and innovation, thus facilitating professionalism and the ability to employ.  E-skills or digital competencies are keys not only for coping in a global digital environment, but also they facilitate the acquisition of knowledge, skills and competencies the directors and employees of the business must have in order to modernize a permanent and effective learning process.

    Training in these new e-skills facilitate a rise in a new area within knowledge management, called PKM (Personal Knowledge Management). Depending on Wikipedia, the personal knowledge management is a collection of processes that one person uses to gather, classify, store, find, recuperate and share knowledge in his/her daily activities and the way in which these activities are done, facilitate work processes.

    This view promotes the notion that workers in the information society and knowledge each time have to be responsible of their own growth and learning and responsible for knowledge management with a focus from bottom to top. In other words, don’t wait for the hierarchy to dictate training. (More …)

     
  • Sandra Bravo Ivorra 9:00 am on December 27, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , human resources, , ,   

    Are Companies Afraid of Discovering Their Internal Talent? 

    Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes

    2013 is coming to a close. Christmas lights are here, garlands, catalogs of toys overflowing mailboxes, the drive to consume compulsively…and, New Year resolutions! This is the best part. When something ends, something new begins, and beginnings always build up hope and facilitate changes.

    New year, new life! January is the month where everyone intends to sign up for the gym to eliminate all the Christmas excess and lead a more healthy life; it is when smokers think about quitting; when we stop to think perhaps we should take better care of our partner or remember to tell our mother how much we lover her… But ideally it is not necessary during this time to ask these things.

    The same thing happens in the work environment. I have heard a few times the argument that all innovation implies a great economic cost and in an environment of a crisis, like the current economic crisis in Spain, no company wants to risk more than what is necessary.

    But propeling new projects does not necessarily mean investing an enormous amount of money in it, rather it may consist of slight changes in entrepreneurial attitudes, in implementing new easy application ideas, in betting on a personal link between our workers, in adequately awarding and valuing the most creative and efficient employees.

    How many companies encourage idea contests? Good ideas are the genuine raw material of the most successful businesses. But it is still surprising how many ideas we throw away everyday and label them useless after the first consideration. Have you ever experimented changing the role of your workers for a short period of time? We were amazed to see what happens when we offer our employees new challenges and responsibilities. Which companies have the courage to frankly and openly show their employees and communicate the good and the bad? Thus, the achievements are shared and failures can be overcome more quickly with support from everyone.

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  • Jose Miguel Bolívar 9:00 am on December 5, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: human resources,   

    10 Indispensable Professional Qualities in the 21st Century 

    Note from the Editor:  Today we share with you this adaptation of the article José Miguel Bolívar published in his blog where he reflects about some indispensable qualities for professionals in the 21st century.

    What qualities define a well equipped person  to successfully meet challenges in the 21st century? There are probably many more, but to me, these 10 points come to mind:

    1. Adaptability: The key to survival is not intelligence nor might. Rather, the capability to adapt. Case in point, having developed the habit of keeping your mind’s cartography, in order to adapt to the world and the circumstances around you, you first need to know where you are.  Many people who do not change do not do it because they are not even conscious that their world has changed.

    2. Tolerance for risk and uncertainty: If there is something we know about the future it is that it will be distinct from what we know and probably distinct in the way we imagine it. The capacity to take on risks in a customary way, know how to cope with failure in a positive way and change the way in which we make decisions, are all essential elements.

    3. Orientation to projects: The ability to work towards concrete results, enclosed in time, combining various activities for one or multiple clients will become increasingly common.

    4. Mobility: The capacity to work in any place widens your possibilities when the time comes to integrate on diverse networks and work on multiple projects. This is one of the main characteristics that defines a knowmad.

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  • María Teresa Farfán 9:00 am on November 27, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , human resources, , ,   

    Collaborative Work vs. Individual Work 

    Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes

    For a long time individual work has been preferred in companies, the premise being that each person “scratches their own nails”. However, the globalization and beginning of new forms of work conception has also opened the doors to collaborative work, in which the entire team has common objectives and to not pursue individual objectives that impede the sustained growth in an organization.

    Why is this important? 

    Collaborative work allows, of those who implement it, to get the most out of their human resources of which already supports the concepts of each partner and collaborator to join in the search for better options for the company.

    Additionally, collaborative work establishes a trust between members of the group, leaving behind those times when each person “scratched their own nails” and opened way to the joined responsibility about the work done. 

    Another great advantage of collaborative work is that it increases and solidifies social relations and, therefore, presents improved organizational culture within the company, an increase in the self-esteem of workers and better management of internal conflicts.
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  • María Teresa Farfán 9:00 am on November 8, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , human resources, ,   

    7 Benefits of a Good Job Analysis 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    How many times has it happened when asking: “What are the functions to be performed in this position?” It can seem as if someone has asked a three year old child about quantum physics. This question can be answered by doing an analysis of appropriate jobs that may have corresponding positions in you organization.

    Many times companies- whether they be small, medium, or large- do not give appropriate importance to the analysis of job posts or they lack an adequate system of information. The result of this will be a terrible human resources organization: Positioning employees in roles in which they do not fit the profile, the designation of faulty duties, compensation beyond market standards, etc.

    Advantages of Job Analysis

    1. Better use of resources. Since having, creating and nurturing an adequate system of information, will thus allow those responsible for decision making to be clear of the resources needed to grow.

    2. Fair compensation. Analyze how employees with similar positions are compensated and compare salaries from the rest of the market.

    3. Determine realistic performance levels. When you know and recognize the important activities and differentiate the urgent activities, so also to additionally assess the value of each of the positions objectively.

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