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  • Larry Alton 8:00 am on July 14, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , management,   

    Twitter ’s Money Move: Will Partnering With Square Boost Their Social Media Game? 

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    Things have been looking rocky lately for Twitter, as the company failed to meet growth expectations, and Twitter’s CEO Dick Costolo stepped down, leaving the company in the hands of Square founder and CEO Jack Dorsey in the interim. Without the same kind of popular cache as Facebook, or the undeniable force of Google, Twitter needs to reevaluate its strategy to make the kind of gains that’ll keep the company on the radar. But what’ll that look like?

    With Dorsey at least temporarily at the helm, many have been hinting at the possibility of a Twitter and Square merger. And, with Square also falling behind in the online payment industry, combining the two might just give both the momentum they need to start grabbing headlines again. As Lior Ronen of Amigobullspoints out, “Both companies could benefit substantially from such a move, in light of their competitive difficulties and business stagnation.” Stagnation’s the enemy of any social media outlet.

    Twitter ’s Growth Troubles

    As the social media scene grows, different networks appeal to different sub-markets. Facebook’s scored big with just about everyone. Pinterest aims for a somewhat older demographic. Tumblr’s audience seems to be getting younger and younger. (More …)

     
  • Larry Alton 9:00 am on July 31, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , management, , ,   

    Cliques in the Workplace 

    Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

    Cliques in the WorkplaceUnfortunately, you didn’t leave behind the cool kid’s lunch table when you left high school. In the adult workplace, there are still cliques, there are still mean girls, and gossip can be just as devastating. It might come with new buzzwords, like “water cooler conversation,” but the reality is that humans (regardless of age) are social creatures and naturally want to form groups. However, we’re also competitive and that can come out fiercer than ever in the real world.

    As a manager, it’s your job to make sure each of your employees can enjoy a positive environment that allows them to flourish, do their job, and enjoy coming to work.

    Like it or not, part of your job is playing social director as well as interior designer. Part of your role is making sure every worker feels welcomed and valued, both from yourself and from everyone else in the office. It’s a tough job being Mama or Papa Bear, but you’re in this position because you have what it takes.

    Playing social director

    There are many ways to encourage holistic socializing both at work and beyond the office hours. For some offices, this means a standing Friday night happy hour at the bar across the street, but you’ve probably noticed that the same people keep showing up (or not showing up), so you’re really just providing an extra avenue for certain cliques to get together. That can be a good thing, but you’re not making serious strides in encouraging the outsiders to join.

    Instead, consider a social function that’s not geared towards the most social butterflies and which doesn’t encourage drinking alcohol. Maybe a lunchtime park cleanup crew, philanthropy group or “club” that welcomes all and tries out a new activity each week or month. You can welcome suggestions by asking everyone to anonymously make recommendations based on something they like, then draw from a hat. Not only will this provide an eclectic range of options, but everyone will also be exposed to a brand new hobby or passion.

    Designing spaces

    The popularity of the open office plan was created to encourage random conversations, creative thinking and a more social area to get work done. However, for some workers a non-stop open space can be distracting and even induce anxiety. Plus, there are some jobs (such as engineers and writers) that really require more private and quiet time for optimal concentration. Instead of a totally open office plan, aim for an open social area.

    (More …)

     
  • Larry Alton 9:00 am on June 25, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: management, ,   

    How to manage virtual employees 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    How to manage virtual employeesThere’s no one best approach to managing virtual employees, but there are sets of best practices you can adopt in a trial and error system. It depends on numerous things like (of course) individual employees, your industry, the tech savviness of workers, how you train and prepare them and what goals you have in mind. As more companies are seeing the appeal of virtual offices, from much lower overhead to happier employees, this is one trend that isn’t going anywhere.

    The simple truth is that, just like a “regular” office, there are workers who will thrive in a virtual setting and those who won’t. The perfect situation is to have some workers performing virtually and others in traditional settings, matching each worker with the best environment for them. If you can swing this, that’s great but that also requires knowing which workers are best matched for which environment.

    If you’re just delving into the world of the virtual office, keep these tips in mind. They won’t work every time and for every employee, but they can help you figure out the right next move.

    1. Provide structure

    This can be in the form of daily or weekly check-ins via chat, video conferencing or phone calls. Nearly every worker still needs their company to provide structure in some regards, but don’t do so just for the sake of it. If some workers do best at midnight and others at 10am and the needs of the company allow for that kind of flexibility, let your employees take advantage of virtual settings.

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  • Pedro Amador 9:00 am on June 12, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , management, , , ,   

    10 tips for treating an employee well 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    10 tips for treating an employee wellManaging employees is by no means easy and people often have to do it without any previous formal training. So I wanted to share ten essential tips that will enhance how you treat your employees, ranked from the least to the most important:

    1. Employees are persons
    2. Given the above, it’s worth pointing out that employees are persons
    3. Just as a suggestion, bear in mind that employees are persons
    4. After doing the above, I might mention the idea that employees are persons
    5. Have we grasped that employees are persons yet?
    6. This tip I learned on my last Masters: employees are persons
    7. I’d also point out that employees are persons
    8. For those of you who may be a bit absent-minded, try to remember that employees are also persons
    9. The most important thing is that employees are persons
    10. The last point is crucial; we are all persons

    It might seem a bit daft, but you should never forget these tips. Employees are persons with values, beliefs, dreams, relatives and so on, and every day you need to align the tasks you ask them to do with company strategy.

    Once you’ve taken this decision, you can then follow the steps set out in any good leadership manual:

    (More …)

     
  • Pedro Amador 9:00 am on April 23, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , management   

    Ten steps to becoming a toxic boss 

    Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

    Ten steps to becoming a toxic boss Are you tired of being unsuccessful? Would you like to be loathed to death but be the one that generates the most revenue? If so, you need to painstakingly stick to the following ten rules that will help you on your way to becoming a toxic boss:

    1. It´s a good idea to keep your head down. Every day that goes by without being fired for making mistakes will increase your severance package as well as the power of your kingdom.

    2. Don’t complicate your life with change. Innovative ideas come and go and there’s no reason why you should put yourself at risk for anything that scares you.

    3. Don’t share your ideas with anyone. Too many people will want to jump on the bandwagon.

    4. Of course, you should automatically pass off any good ideas that your staff and colleagues have as your own in front of your bosses. There’s no need to name names; it all happens thanks to you.

    5. Don’t show any gratitude. People are paid for their work and that should be enough.

    (More …)

     
  • Juan Ignacio Barenys 9:00 am on January 7, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: management, , ,   

    Managers… Born or Made? 

    Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes

    The time of the industrial era has definitely passed in which the business organization gave rise to plots almost completely sealed from those who thought, those who worked and those who controlled. In this setting, the manager was essentially the controller, taking on a role in which his/her competence was measured above all by the attainment of objectives through hierarchical organizations.

    Today, the new management philosophy flags the information and service as necessary elements for the effective functioning of organizations that, in a progressive way, abandon the hierarchy and substitute it with the collective. This change is not trivial, it is the opposite: it very directly introduces the need for leadership in a manager 2.0, and this takes us to confront the question- Is leadership is an aptitude with which one is born with? Or an ability that is made? 

    I am going to venture: the two of them. But not in the way– yes or no– as if to evaluate the kindness of a piece of code. It is not easy to address this question, but its difficulty does not excuse us from doing so.

    If hierarchies weaken, on one hand, while reinforcing coordination requirements; on the other hand, there is no choice but to invigorate the interstitial loops holding the organization together and keep people closely connected with the organization. Here, a manager 2.0’s role is located- leader by demand. 

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  • Virginio Gallardo 9:00 am on December 20, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , management, , ,   

    12 Behaviors of a Transformational Leader 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    Note from the Editor: Today we bring you this article that Virginio Gallardo published in his blog which we found interesting to open a new discussion thread at Zyncro. What types of leaders are there in businesses? What type of leader transforms an enterprise into a social enterprise? What characteristics should this leader have? Tell us in the comment section 😉

    We are in a new age where talent management requires new leadership. I suggest that we analyze the characteristics of the new transformational leader from six leadership styles that include different levels of performance from emotional self-management to the management of internal and external communities.

    Style 1 : Emotional Manager (central axis): Leadership is managing emotions designated as emotional intelligence that is at the center of leadership development; starting to lead ourselves can lead others towards self-knowledge, self-regulation being one of the most important bases for managing teams.

    • Behavior 1: Recognize the motives and intention strengthening the trust between individuals with objectives on the team
    • Behavior 2: Create a trusting emotional environment that appropriately fosters apprenticeship and innovation 

    Style 2: Motivator for achievement (present/results): Objectives are clearly established, giving demanding monitoring while in accordance with each employee’s potential. This is the base of attainment for some excellent results. Results are the best expression of leadership and innovation, but they are also one of the elements that reinforce excellent performance.

    • Behavior 3: Promotes the generation of ideas leading actions that improve results  
    • Behavior 4.: Appropriate demands for results from the potential and abilities of each employee 

    (More …)

     
  • Francisco Eguiza 9:00 am on December 12, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , management, , , , ,   

    5 Mandatory Books Every Director, Manager and CEO Must Read 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    No one person knows everything! Not even a manager, director or CEO of a big company. Are you a director, CEO or leader of an organization? The following titles are must read books for your body of information.

    Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In – by Roger Fisher and William L. Ury

    Roger Fisher (pseudonym), former director of the negotiation and innovation project at Harvard, specializes in conflict management and negotiation. In his book “Getting To Yes”, he demonstrates the structure of interpersonal negotiation, by underlying a reference to the labor and teamwork delegation.

    This book gives us improved practices to address problems, interests and conflicts, exhibits the power of mutual agreement, business collaboration and the unspoken power of objective thought.

    Survival is Not Enough – by Seth Godin

    Seth Godin is the guru of marketing. In this book he transforms the Darwinian theory of specie evolution in a metaphor arguing how companies need to constantly change in order to adapt to a unstable economic environment. Godin’s original approach, arguing real cases, make this book an imperative read for any great business person.

    Godin’s convincing proposal offers each reader a reflective element about the importance of adaptation to changing realities and technological forces that move today’s businesses, especially culture 2.0.

    (More …)

     
  • Juan Ignacio Barenys 9:00 am on November 6, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: management, , , ,   

    Manager 2.0: A One-Man Band? 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    For the last 10 or 15 years, technology consulting companies have consolidated a complex professional figure around project management and professional groups: the manager. Thus people with the following profile are appointed: important academic training, between the ages of 30 to 40, little field experience specifically oriented to technology, but yes to experience in management, personal skills and social standards, professional career ambition, and vocation to take on responsibilities.

    The fast growth of many companies has been based on the creation of hierarchical structures in which the manager has played a major role as a linker between business strategy and technical mass. The manager’s role has been to design and implement, with great agility, the tactical approaches to respond the objectives of the first, and at the same time be able to organize and direct the second. The result can be described as acceptable, with an important caveat.

    The same business strategies that created the breeding ground for the environment of management did not put enough care to accompany such professionals in their professional development in the long term and, consequently, little foresaw the high degree of pressure to which they are subject. The high domestic and foreign competition, and the need for continuous updated training to cover the gap in competent management teams

    The manager has to negotiate, represent the company, select, evaluate, motivate and directly direct other professionals, whom may be more prepared in the technical content than the manager, produce proposals and, many times, sell them, etc.  A myriad of hats that fit more or less on the manager’s head but have not been made or adapted to suit him/her. (More …)

     
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  • Sandra Bravo Ivorra 9:00 am on October 31, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , management, ,   

    The Value of a Company is not Measured by Money 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    We can have talent in front of our noses and sometimes do not realize it. We all have capabilities to exploit, a series of characteristics that makes us unique and special. However, many people never get to develop them. Why? Because fear blocks them. It costs us to try new things, to investigate, be creative, or take risks. We are afraid of losing it all, even though in reality we don’t have anything to lose.

    This does not happen only between individuals, rather in companies that tend to see changes more reluctantly.  In most cases, decisions are made solely on the basis of “the numbers”, that are important, but they are not everything and, moreover, often do not improve just because of not innovating nor thinking strategically.

    At the end of each year, companies often present their accounts: their fiscal balance, sales levels, national and international expansion…But, do they perhaps speak of the level of achievement of workers, the degree of fellowship, or their training needs? How much time does a company dedicate to consider whether their workers feel proud and happy to be part of the project?  Is a good working environment promoted with leisure times to strengthen personal ties?  Many people may think that’s not the job of a company, and they have the right to think so, but I think that has a high impact on the results and the survival of a business, whatever it is. (More …)

     
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