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  • María Teresa Farfán 9:00 am on June 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , teamwork   

    7 types of workers in the company 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    7 types of workers in the companyKnowing how our colleagues work enables us, as a company, to shepherd them towards attaining their objectives and to make full use of their contributions.

    It is important to ascertain which team members may have specific aptitudes for certain jobs, such as concentration, the ability to work for hours on end, to interact with others, etc. This allows each leader to know his or her team and to distribute the work as efficiently as possible.

    As a leader, have you ever asked yourself what your team’s skills are? In a recent e-book, PGI classified the most common types of remote employees: How do they behave? How do they perceive their work?

    This e-book recognises 7 different types of remote employees, which I list below. How can each one capitalise on the advantages of an Enterprise Social Network? 

    1. The 24/7 Worker:

    We all know someone who answers emails at whatever time of day. This worker is a highly-dedicated stress junkie, so he exploits the advantages of an internal social network more effectively, since it will allow him to communicate with his colleagues at any time.

    2. The Multitasker:

    He’s the one who always has more than one tab open on his browser, at the same time as he’s sharing information via his smartphone and checking tasks pending on his tablet. This type of worker has to be constantly on the go, so the benefits of a multi-platform enterprise social network will help him to attain his work goals and to focus on his setting.

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  • Rodrigo Escobedo 9:00 am on January 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , teamwork   

    Do You Set Goals for Your Business? Or Just Wishful Thinking? 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    We are in the era where we define and execute new goals in the new year. The question is: How many goals did you accomplish last year? The reality is that we are used to filling ourselves with “wishful thinking”, in our life and in our business, thus not fulfilling actual goals. And the sad thing is that new year resolutions become a list of actions or changes that take place the first week of January, and later, they end up throwing in the towel and going back to the same old habits.      

    If we want to accomplish these resolutions and not convert them into a list thrown into the trash as quickly as children throw wrapping paper from their presents away on the 25th of December; if we want to talk about true goals, key points to consider are:

    1. To be sufficiently specific, i.e., detail it as much as possible so that there is clarity (without the need to provide previous explanations) and both you as a business professional, as your work team, perfectly understand the goal to achieve. An Enterprise Social Network allows you to transfer the message in a clear and concise way.

    2. It must be measurable, i.e., have a quantifiable parameter that allows you to know how you are advancing with respect to the goal and time.

    3. It should be reachable. Beforehand, know that it is a challenge, but with this additional effort, you will be able to achieve the goal. If you obtain it without effort, then it is not a goal. It is only a task.

    4. Target a result. Let it be clear- why do I want to achieve this goal? What do I get when the goal is reached?

    5. Define a specific date to reach this goal, or a clear time mark. The act of it being reachable generally goes tied to this criterion. Then be realistic, yet bold in setting the date for this goal.

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  • Denisse Caballero 9:00 am on January 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , teamwork   

    Team Management vs. Leadership 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    liderazgo vs team managementFirst things first: What does it really mean to direct a work team and how does it differentiate with leadership? John P Kotter explains that leaders are people who do the right things, while the directors/managers are people who do things correctly. This does not mean that one is better than the other; in fact, these two roles are complementary to each other and to operate a team at work to be successful, you need to meet both requirements.

    We understand that  the basis of leadership is founded on the vision of the future, how to communicate that vision and helping people to understand and achieve. On the other hand, directors are those responsible for making this vision to be implemented effectively and successfully, in other words “create plans” to achieve that. That said we clarify that a leader is not necessarily a manager and not the opposite, but it is possible that they can be.

    On one hand, a real manager will provide order, therefore organize and promote compliance with the company’s plans, this will do it by making decisions and delegating functions using a formal structure to generate stability and avoid poor performance. A leader will establish a communication process and will push his/her team together utilizing informal relationships to establish bonds, of which will motivate the workers to transmit said energy to the rest of the team.

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  • Francisco Eguiza 9:00 am on December 12, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , teamwork,   

    5 Mandatory Books Every Director, Manager and CEO Must Read 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    No one person knows everything! Not even a manager, director or CEO of a big company. Are you a director, CEO or leader of an organization? The following titles are must read books for your body of information.

    Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In – by Roger Fisher and William L. Ury

    Roger Fisher (pseudonym), former director of the negotiation and innovation project at Harvard, specializes in conflict management and negotiation. In his book “Getting To Yes”, he demonstrates the structure of interpersonal negotiation, by underlying a reference to the labor and teamwork delegation.

    This book gives us improved practices to address problems, interests and conflicts, exhibits the power of mutual agreement, business collaboration and the unspoken power of objective thought.

    Survival is Not Enough – by Seth Godin

    Seth Godin is the guru of marketing. In this book he transforms the Darwinian theory of specie evolution in a metaphor arguing how companies need to constantly change in order to adapt to a unstable economic environment. Godin’s original approach, arguing real cases, make this book an imperative read for any great business person.

    Godin’s convincing proposal offers each reader a reflective element about the importance of adaptation to changing realities and technological forces that move today’s businesses, especially culture 2.0.

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  • María Teresa Farfán 9:00 am on November 27, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , teamwork   

    Collaborative Work vs. Individual Work 

    Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes

    For a long time individual work has been preferred in companies, the premise being that each person “scratches their own nails”. However, the globalization and beginning of new forms of work conception has also opened the doors to collaborative work, in which the entire team has common objectives and to not pursue individual objectives that impede the sustained growth in an organization.

    Why is this important? 

    Collaborative work allows, of those who implement it, to get the most out of their human resources of which already supports the concepts of each partner and collaborator to join in the search for better options for the company.

    Additionally, collaborative work establishes a trust between members of the group, leaving behind those times when each person “scratched their own nails” and opened way to the joined responsibility about the work done. 

    Another great advantage of collaborative work is that it increases and solidifies social relations and, therefore, presents improved organizational culture within the company, an increase in the self-esteem of workers and better management of internal conflicts.
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  • Francisco Eguiza 9:00 am on November 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , teamwork   

    4 Recommendations for Teamwork within an Enterprise Social Network 

    Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes

    One of the main benefits of Enterprise Social Networks is the act of putting in motion collaborative work that comes from teamwork. However, being a relatively new technology and somewhat avant-garde, some companies that adopt this impulse as a project, don’t know the areas of opportunity very well in the teamwork environment. Below you can find 4 recommendations for working in a team within an enterprise social network.

    1. Grouping and Organization: This can definitely be the main mission on the list. If you will work in a team, it is imperative to group together members in areas, departments, projects, and any other topic that can be useful. What must be present is maintaining all members informed, active and conscious of their tasks.

    2. Use clear and short messages: One of the benefits of implementing an enterprise social network as a social ecosystem in the company or business, is the reduction of emails. And it is really a benefit, as arriving to the office and finding a chain of 20 emails with only one sentence answers takes time and minimizes productivity.

    The enterprise social network is useful for communicating, taking advantage of private messaging to ask questions, to clarify points, ask VoBo’s in a micro-blogging post so those involved can see…it is never necessary to draft an extensive email or copy 7 people in the company, when the message can be clear, concise and direct to the person on the team who is really interested.
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  • Hugo Moreno 9:00 am on October 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , teamwork   

    The Strategic Route of DirCom 

    Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

    Today in businesses, communication is an indispensable practical strategy to create synergies, align knowledge, comprehension, attitudes and behavior. The societies and organizations are complex human groups organized in networks with multiple connections within and outside of their environments where people’s experiences imply the change of time and space territories.

    Therefore the work of Dircom requires a high level of sofistication technically and with tools that allow planning, operating, measuring and evaluating with the necessary indicators that give certainty and efficiency to their strategies and, above all, to obtain verifiable impacted business results.

    Actually, the successful communication strategy paths must pass by the technologies that facilitate the logistics of the flow of information in social frameworks that do not have borders, coordination, interactions, the following, the quantitative measurement and qualitative processes of individuals and groups in different managerial and operational levels, as well as evaluating the human transactions internally in the organizations.

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  • Raúl González García 9:00 am on July 12, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , teamwork, ,   

    Three occupational competences that mark the difference between the 20th and 21st centuries 

    Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

    Three occupational competences that mark the difference between the 20th and 21st centuriesThree e-competences that still haven’t been learnt at many universities but that are still in great demand in many organizations:

    1. From the individual we have gone towards the team, and from the team we are going towards the network.

    If the capacity to work in a team was one of the most sought-after competences in the last decades of the 20th century, today it has been joined by the ability to work in networks.

    An omnipresent job, without the usual physical barriers and more flexible relationships, requires the ability to adapt and collaborate openly with all types of environment and people. From the traditional workplace, we are in the transition towards the virtual work environment, in which individuals work connected with different projects, new people and different work structures.

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  • Manel Alcalde 9:00 am on July 2, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , teamwork   

    Enterprise 2.0: from management to autonomy…With shades in between? 

    Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

    Since June, employees at Yahoo aren’t allowed to work from home. Marissa Mayer, CEO of the company, decided that the era of teleworking was over. The decision was seen as a contradiction, as a “return to a management” foreign to the style of a leading IT company.

    The idea of the social company is closely tied with self-management of employees. One of the major advantages of collaborative tools is they reduce the cost of group action and management, enabling companies to focus on their real mission and extending the profit margins. It has been demonstrated that knowledge workers don’t usually respond to traditional motivation systems, based fundamentally on economic compensation, rather that on its scale of motivational values which rewards issues such as autonomy, the desire for improvement in performance, and working with a clear, significant purpose.

    The social company has the tools necessary to drive collective action based on “scattered” work groups and in turn requires autonomy if it wants to promote the prized engagement with its mission among its employees.

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  • Jeroen Sangers 9:00 am on May 16, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , teamwork   

    Working out loud 

    Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

    I’m a freelancer working from home. A large part of my day, I don’t have anyone near, but I don’t work alone. On a daily basis, I’m in contact with my clients, my providers, and my partners with whom I collaborate on various projects.

    However, at times I miss the office’s coffee machine, where I could comment the latest news and laugh with my co-workers. These co-workers were also a major source of feedback related to my work.

    But there are also things that I don’t miss, like weekly meetings to discuss the status of projects.

    Now I only have my partner to have coffee with and comment the news. The rest of my communication has gone digital.

    Collaboration 2.0

    Nowadays, there are many tools to collaborate without needing to be in the same location, from email and Twitter—I still remember the interface at the beginning that went: “What are you doing?”—to complete platforms like Zyncro.

    When partners and co-workers aren’t in the same location, internal communication becomes even more important to generate results.

    Whenever I collaborate in projects remotely, I apply two habits that Bryce Williams identified in his post When will we Work Out Loud? Soon!

    Working out loud = Observable work + Narrating your work

    Observable Work

    This concept simply implies that the intermediate result of my work can be accessed by my co-workers. Instead of saving the document I’m writing in the folder My Documents on my computer, I use online platforms where my partners can see and comment on the progress and even edit the document.

    Based on this feedback, I can correct the focus of my work as soon as possible, and get better results in a shorter time.

    Modern collaboration platforms display in real time what each member of the team is working on. Each time I edit a document, my colleagues can see a notification in the system, even a summary with the changes made. What’s more, all the material is centralized and indexed in order to find the required information quickly.

    Narrate Your Work

    Similarly, I keep a public diary (blog or micro-blog) where I explain openly what I’m doing, what problems I encounter, what solutions I have found, and how I feel. I also share relevant articles I have found and obviously there is space for a joke once in a while.

    Finally, when working on a big project, I try to communicate each day at least these points:

    1. What I have done today
    2. What I have been unable to do
    3. What are the risks I have identified that will affect the project planning
    4. What my plans are for tomorrow

    During the day I keep a document open where I gradually answer these points. At the end of the day, I just have to publish it.

    If everyone in the team narrated their work openly, we wouldn’t need any meetings to assess project status and we would gain a lot of time.

    People who are already familiar with collaboration tools perfectly understand the benefits of working out loud. Others simply need to try it for a while to learn that they can collaborate efficiently remotely.

    Jeroen Sangers (@JeroenSangers) is personal productivity consultant and author of the blog El Canasto. He specializes in modern techniques to manage time, actions and attention, and provides training, consulting, and keynotes on a more intelligent way to work and live.

    If you want to enjoy the benefits that collaborating has for your productivity too, why not try Zyncro free?

     
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